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ASME Conference Presenter Attendance Policy and Archival Proceedings

2010;():i. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-NS.
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This online compilation of papers from the ASME/USCG 2010 2nd Workshop on Marine Technology and Standards (MTS2010) represents the archival version of the Conference Proceedings. According to ASME’s conference presenter attendance policy, if a paper is not presented at the Conference by an author of the paper, the paper will not be published in the official archival Proceedings, which are registered with the Library of Congress and are submitted for abstracting and indexing. The paper also will not be published in The ASME Digital Collection and may not be cited as a published paper.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Offshore Marine Technology

2010;():1-9. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0201.
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To avoid making billion dollar mistakes, operators with discoveries in deepwater (∼3,000m) Gulf of Mexico (GoM) need dependable well performance, reservoir response and fluid data to guide full-field development decisions. Recognizing this need, the DeepStar consortium developed a conceptual design for an Early Production System (EPS) that will serve as a mobile well test system that is safe, environmentally friendly and cost-effective.

The EPS is a dynamically positioned (DP) Floating, Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel with a bundled top tensioned riser having quick emergency disconnect capability. Both oil and gas are processed onboard and exported by shuttle tankers to local markets. Oil is stored and offloaded using standard FPSO techniques, while the gas is exported as Compressed Natural Gas (CNG).

This paper summarizes the technologies, regulatory acceptance, and business model that will make the DeepStar EPS a reality.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Green Ship Technology

2010;():10-15. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0202.
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Fuel cells with hydrogen fuel have now been demonstrated in public transportation for over 15 years worldwide. During this time Ballard-powered fuel cell buses have clocked more than 300,000 hours while accumulating over 5 million kilometers. These public transport buses have been certified and homologated in the USA, Europe, Australia and China. While certification agencies such as TUV, CHP, NHTSA, and other local governing bodies have been involved with the approval process for ensuring safety of personnel and equipment, the components themselves have met stringent requirements of NFPA, NGV, SAE, ASME, ANSI and other governing organizations.

This paper highlights the various standards and safety concepts used in the approval process of public transportation using fuel cell buses. Since marine ferries involve movement of personnel, it is recommended that many of the requirements used for public buses can be easily adapted for marine applications of fuel cells.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2010;():16-38. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0203.
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This discussion paper is based on a preliminary design and is not to be construed or interpreted as being a suitable basis for adoption as a final design for natural gas storage facilities or marine vessels. The gas storage concepts were developed as a basis for project budgeting, further design studies such as HAZID/HAZOP/FEMA, and for review/comment by Classification Societies and Regulatory Authorities as a precedent to further design development. The contents, comments and opinions contained herein are proprietary to Floating Pipeline Company Incorporated and TransCanada.

Paper published with permission.

Topics: Fuels , Natural gas , Storage
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2010;():39-47. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0204.
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In discussing the use of Natural Gas as a fuel for Marine use, there are two aspects that require examination, firstly, the gas handling, process and on land/vessel storage considerations, and secondly, the pressure vessels that will store the fuel.

Paper published with permission.

Topics: Vessels
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Emerging Technology

2010;():48-52. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0205.
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Current Status of Technology

• 10 systems have received Type Approval certificates

• 14 have received IMO final approval

 • a further 3 are expecting final approval at MEPC 60

• 8 others have basic approval

 • A further 7 may receive basic approval at MEPC 60

It is important to note that, not all systems are required to follow the IMO basic and final approval path to Type Approval as outlined in Procedure G9. If the system does not utilize an active substance as a biocide, a separate procedure for testing and verification according to Procedure G8 is undertaken. That said, it is expected that several systems are in the process of obtaining Type Approval in this manner as well, adding to those mentioned above.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2010;():53-57. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0206.
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Cold Iron:Receipt of shore power, along with other utilities such as potable water and steam, is part of the process of placing the engineering plant in a status known as “cold iron.” The term originates from the steamship era, when ship boilers and engines would go relatively cold after being secured. To bring a steam plant back online, supplying its own power after a “cold iron” period, would involve a substantial light-off, warm-up, and transition period compared to modern, fully automated plants.

Onshore power supply (OPS, sometimes referred to as “cold ironing”) is a system of procedures and equipment that provides ships with a source of electrical power as an alternative to the ship’s service electrical power system. The primary benefit is that, since the ship no longer has main or auxiliary engines operating, the engine emissions are virtually eliminated in the port area. Many ports around the world are located near large populations, and engine emissions from ships unfortunately contribute to unwanted levels of nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, particulate matter, and even the “greenhouse gas” carbon dioxide. Onshore power supply achieves a better total emissions reduction result than ship-installed emissions equipment, because the engines are off-line. On the other hand, there are difficulties associated with high voltage, varying frequencies, safety and infrastructure costs that must be addressed in order to justify an onshore power supply installation.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2010;():58-66. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0207.
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Contaminants in marine wastewater facing current or near-future regulations can be broadly categorized to free oil & suspended solids, emulsified oil and dissolved solids, and biological organisms. The first category of contaminants has been treated by commercially available OWS systems. The second class of contaminants, emulsified oils and dissolved solids, has been effectively treated by UF membrane filtration and to a less extent by biological oxidation and surface modified filters. A survey of recent advances in physical and chemical demulsification technologies to enhance emulsified oil removal with reduced loads on membrane was conducted. The study also identified new applications for treatments of biological organisms in ballast water.

Paper published with permission.

Topics: Sewage
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Codes and Standards

2010;():67-78. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0208.
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The need for more efficient and cost effective design of ship board equipment has never been greater. Pressure vessels on board ships can account for significant volume and weight and thus affect the overall performance of the vessel. Classically ship board pressure vessels have been designed to ASME Section VIII, Division 1. This code requires pressure vessels that are designed using a basic design by rule approach with a 3.5 to 1 design margin on specified minimum tensile strength. In recent years the ASME Standards Committee that is responsible for Section VIII has developed two design codes, Section VIII, Division 2 Alternative Rules for Construction of Pressure Vessels and Section VIII, Division 3 Alternative Rules for Construction of High Pressure Vessels. These pressure vessel design codes offer lower design margins, an improved design by rule approach for Division 2 and allow or require design by analysis based on the vessel operating conditions and environment such as cyclic service. Use of these codes can improve ship board vessel design by lowering the weight of vessels while providing a safe reliable pressure vessel.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2010;():79-86. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0209.
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ASME has a project to meet industry needs for pressure vessel Code updates to address storage of high pressure hydrogen. This has resulted in updates to existing B&PV Code, new Code Cases, and new Code requirements. One of the tasks was to develop requirements for high pressure composite reinforced vessels with non-load sharing liners. Originally developed as a Code Case, the requirements have been approved as mandatory Appendix 8 of ASME Section X of the B&PV Code, to be published in July 2010. The allowed pressures of this new Code are from 0.7 MPa (3,000 psi) to 103.4 MPa (15,000 psi). Qualification testing addresses expected operating conditions. Inspection requirements are being developed in cooperation with NBIC. Pressure vessels are being developed that meet the new ASME requirements. Efforts will be made to include additional gases, including compressed natural gas, and additional operational requirements in future revisions.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2010;():87-94. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0210.
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Developed at the request of the US Department of Transportation, Section XII-Transport Tanks, of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code addresses rules for the construction and continued service of pressure vessels for the transportation of dangerous goods by road, air, rail, or water. The standard is intended to replace most of the vessel design rules and be referenced in the federal hazardous material regulations, Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). While the majority of the current rules focus on over-the-road transport, there are rules for portable tanks which can be used in marine applications for the transport of liquefied gases, and for ton tanks used for rail and barge shipping of chlorine and other compressed gases. Rules for non-cryogenic portable tanks are currently provided in Section VIII, Division 2, but will be moved into Section XII. These portable tank requirements should also replace the existing references to the outmoded 1989 edition of ASME Section VIII, Division 1 cited in Title 46 of the CFR.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2010;():95-102. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0211.
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Composite pressure vessels have been used for over 40 years in a variety of military, aerospace, marine, transportation, stationary, and vehicle applications. Codes, standards, and guidelines have been developed to address vessel performance in these high pressure applications by ASME and American Bureau of Shipping (ABS). A risk or hazard identification analysis may be conducted during qualification and approval process. Prototype and qualification testing in these standards validate the design and anticipated operating conditions. Knowledge has been gained from qualification testing, field experience, and inspection that supports selection of materials and design configurations for marine and land based applications. Periodic inspection of vessels mitigates risk, particularly in terms of detecting environmental and mechanically induced damage before failure can occur. This paper was written jointly between ABS and Lincoln Composites through the certification process of Lincoln’s Titan™ project. This paper will outline qualification of technology and, testing requirements, as well as discuss the basis for hazard mitigation and material selection in the marine environment.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2010;():103-107. doi:10.1115/MTS2010-0212.
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This paper discusses the potential to use fuel cell technology for marine applications. The topics discussed include a definition of a fuel cell, the types of fuel cells and their applications, fuels currently used by various fuel cell designs, the status of supporting product safety standards, the existing model and design codes for the storage and piping of various fuels, the existing model and design codes for the dispensing of various fuels, and potential near term applications for powering marine vessels and other equipment.

Paper published with permission.

Topics: Fuel cells , Pipes
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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