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ASME Conference Presenter Attendance Policy and Archival Proceedings

2017;():i. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-NS.
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This online compilation of papers from the ASME/USCG 2017 4th Workshop on Marine Technology and Standards (MTS2017) represents the archival version of the Conference Proceedings. According to ASME’s conference presenter attendance policy, if a paper is not presented at the Conference by an author of the paper, the paper will not be published in the official archival Proceedings, which are registered with the Library of Congress and are submitted for abstracting and indexing. The paper also will not be published in The ASME Digital Collection and may not be cited as a published paper.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Transport and Use of Natural Gas

2017;():1-9. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-0401.
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The purpose of this paper is to briefly explain the Waterway Suitability Assessment (WSA) process required for U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals, highlight the quantitative risk assessment tools utilized and how they work together to adequately assess the risks, and introduce qualitative best-practices to reduce review time and improve stakeholder collaboration and receptivity. As each maritime port has a different composition of commercial vessel traffic and operating practices, these tools and methods are combined to form a Risk-Based Approach, rather than a prescriptive assessment tool, ensuring a holistic understanding and mitigation plan concerning localized LNG transportation.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2017;():10-22. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-0402.
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CNG has significant environmental and economic advantages as a marine fuel in commercial applications as well as law enforcement and recreational use. This paper covers the current technical and business aspects of the current deployment of CNG marine systems for boat propulsion, on-board power generation, fueling operation and the practical considerations that make it all possible today for the different use of boats. The technology and its benefits are reviewed and measurements from existing CNG hybrid boats currently in operation are analyzed.

Paper published with permission.

Topics: Boats
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Shipboard Technologies for Energy Efficiency

2017;():23-28. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-0403.
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Ship ballasting and de-ballasting are critical to a ship’s stability, and a major part of ship and port operations. Here, we examine the current procedures and potential issues that can arise when a quick turnaround in port is required. Through time-based modeling of the ship’s systems, new methods were used to analyze the feasibility of each scenario as well as ensure the systems were operating optimally. After rigorous testing, a new approach was developed to decrease time in port, increase system reliability/safety, and improve overall efficiency.

Paper published with permission.

Topics: Modeling , Ships
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Use of Alternative Fuels for Ship Systems

2017;():29-38. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-0404.
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Industrial use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) has a surprisingly long history. The first practical refrigeration system was built in 1873; the first commercial liquefaction plant was built in 1917. Over time two applications have been developed that are relevant to the current paper. The first involves storage of LNG to handle peak demand in pipeline systems, the process is identified as “peak shaving”. A second application is the transport of hydrocarbon fuel where gas pipelines are unavailable.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Offshore Marine Technology

2017;():39-43. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-0405.
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In the current low oil cost environment, dive contractors are exploring the possibility of reactivating existing systems rather than building new. In addition to classing ships and platforms, the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) also classes saturation diving systems. In this paper, the Author describes the basic division of ABS into Engineering and Survey sides, and provides background on the ABS Underwater Rules and the ASME PVHO Standard. The author discusses obtaining a class certificate for a SAT system and then outlines the process for returning a previously classed system to class, and the process for classing an existing unclassed system.

Paper published with permission.

Topics: Ships
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2017;():44-50. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-0406.
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Recent commercial activities in the deeper regions of seas and oceans have placed increasing demands for higher strength-to-weight ratio tension members with certain improved mechanical properties. Activities such as heavy lifting in subsea regions can impose extreme dynamic loading conditions as well as other environmental factors on ropes used as tension members for those applications. In this paper, some recently developed synthetic fiber and hybrid tension member technologies that may provide solutions for some of these challenging needs are presented. A proposal for a hybrid rope concept is presented which is envisioned to provide for more effective cooling of the rope in high cycle bending applications such as active heave compensated winches. A proposal for numerical modeling and experimental evaluation of heat transfer rates in such a hybrid rope is briefly presented. A short overview of the current ASME B30 standard volumes for land-based crane rope usage and inspection, as well as ISO 4309 and the API 2D standards will also be presented.

Paper published with permission.

Topics: Temperature , Ropes
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Regulatory/Classification Society Developments

2017;():51-56. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-0407.
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What was common between the capsizing of the cruise liner Costa Concordia, engine fire on the Carnival Triumph and the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon rig?

In all cases, the people impacted did not believe or find that the authorities, whether public or private, were capable of meeting their immediate needs. Consequently, such biases led to collective behavior or ‘herding’ with devastating outcomes.

Holding true to its mission of marine safety, the United States Coast Guard (USCG) finds itself in roles of maritime incident management and provider of training for examination of foreign ships carrying U.S. passengers.

Also, following land-based costal events such as Hurricane Harvey, the USCG is called upon to perform rescue operations in which risk assessment through effective communication between stakeholders becomes extremely important.

Accordingly, this paper proposes a performance-based approach to occupant safety, occupant circulation, and hazard communication so that both classification rules can be developed and guidelines can be proposed for inclusion in the USCG Incident Management Handbook.

Advances in the analysis and modelling of the movement of people, especially in building fires, have established the decision-making processes that individuals or groups undergo before reacting to an imminent danger. When a large number of people have a high commitment either to activity or to inactivity, it becomes important that an equilibrium solution is adopted and the resources are allocated accordingly.

The author proposes evaluating incident management as a dynamic system. Like any dynamic system, incident management for any disaster, evolves with time in terms of scale, needed inputs and desired outputs. Engineers today have the capability to influence the outputs by establishing protocols for sharing of information and resources among the stakeholders. The author presented a paper on a similar topic at ASME’s Dynamic Systems and Controls Conference (DSCC 2015)3.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2017;():57-63. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-0408.
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Industrial fluid handling and storage systems can experience excessive pressure resulting from process upsets. A catastrophic component failure can compromise personnel safety or damage property. A pressure relief valve (PRV) represents a common design element that allows material to be vented to reduce pressure and restore safe conditions. Obviously selecting the proper PRV requires specification of the relief pressure. Less obvious might be the requirement of confirming that the flowrate is adequate to vent the system volume.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
2017;():64-75. doi:10.1115/MTS2017-0409.
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The Manned Underwater Vehicles industry has evolved since the launch of DSV ALVIN in 1964 and the establishment of tourist passenger submersibles in the 1980’s and 1990’s. The emergence of the tourist passenger submersible sector in 1993 prompted the US Coast Guard to regulate commercial marine operations in the interest of public safety through NVIC 5-93. The rules were designed specifically for submersibles selling seats to members of the general public. To ensure public safety, the USCG helped define safeguards for those participants. Submersibles owned by the government, research institutions and corporations; or submersibles used for purposes other than selling rides to members of the general public, were not wholly addressed because growth in that sector was unforeseen. Almost 25 years after its release, the industry is regulated across all sectors of MUV operations by definitions established for the operation of a narrow segment of the industry, the tourism submersibles. However, construction over the past 23 years is 18% tourism submersibles, 8% government and 7% research. The remaining 67% of vessels, fall into an “other” category which does not have adequate definition. This white papers proposes that the Marine Technology Society committee on Manned Underwater Vehicles conduct a study for an updated Manned Underwater Vehicle Operations Safety Guideline with broad participation of the MUV stakeholders; International MUV industry members, Marine Technology Society, ASME PVHO, ABS, DNVGL, US Coast Guard and Navy. The challenge is to find the correct balance of regulatory control and commercial freedom to promote commercial growth while having a robust regulatory framework to manage the various concepts.

Paper published with permission.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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