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Stable Cadence Tracking of Admitting Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycle

[+] Author Affiliations
Christian A. Cousin, Victor H. Duenas, Courtney A. Rouse, Warren E. Dixon

University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Paper No. DSCC2018-8989, pp. V001T07A003; 7 pages
doi:10.1115/DSCC2018-8989
From:
  • ASME 2018 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference
  • Volume 1: Advances in Control Design Methods; Advances in Nonlinear Control; Advances in Robotics; Assistive and Rehabilitation Robotics; Automotive Dynamics and Emerging Powertrain Technologies; Automotive Systems; Bio Engineering Applications; Bio-Mechatronics and Physical Human Robot Interaction; Biomedical and Neural Systems; Biomedical and Neural Systems Modeling, Diagnostics, and Healthcare
  • Atlanta, Georgia, USA, September 30–October 3, 2018
  • Conference Sponsors: Dynamic Systems and Control Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-5189-0
  • Copyright © 2018 by ASME

abstract

Rehabilitation robotics and functional electrical stimulation (FES) are two promising methods of rehabilitation for people with neurological disorders. In motorized FES cycling, both the rider and the motorized cycle must be controlled for cooperative human-machine interaction. While rehabilitation goals vary widely, FES cycling traditionally rejects rider disturbances to accomplish cadence and power tracking; however, this paper ensures that the cycle accommodates the rider without rejecting rider disturbances as a means to promote function and strength recovery while ensuring rider safety. A cadence and admittance controller are developed to activate the cycle’s electric motor and the rider’s leg muscles through FES when kinematically efficient. Using a single set of combined cycle-rider dynamics, a Lyapunov-like switched systems analysis is conducted to conclude global exponential cadence tracking. A subsequent passivity analysis is conducted to show the admittance controller is passive with respect to the rider. For a desired cadence of 50 RPM, preliminary experiments on one able-bodied participant and one participant with spina bifida demonstrate tracking errors of −0.07±2.59 RPM and −0.20±3.86 RPM, respectively.

Copyright © 2018 by ASME
Topics: Cycles

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