0

Full Content is available to subscribers

Subscribe/Learn More  >

Kinematics of an Articulated Connecting Rod and its Effect on Simulated Compression Pressures and Port Timings

[+] Author Affiliations
Kelsey Fieseler, Timothy J. Jacobs

Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

Mark Patterson

GE Oil & Gas, Houston, TX

Paper No. ICEF2017-3670, pp. V002T07A013; 9 pages
doi:10.1115/ICEF2017-3670
From:
  • ASME 2017 Internal Combustion Engine Division Fall Technical Conference
  • Volume 2: Emissions Control Systems; Instrumentation, Controls, and Hybrids; Numerical Simulation; Engine Design and Mechanical Development
  • Seattle, Washington, USA, October 15–18, 2017
  • Conference Sponsors: Internal Combustion Engine Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-5832-5
  • Copyright © 2017 by ASME

abstract

This study discusses the motion of the articulated connecting rod of an integral-engine compressor and the effect of the kinematics on in-cylinder pressure and port timings. A piston position modeling technique based on kinematics and engine geometry is proposed in order to improve the accuracy of simulated in-cylinder compression pressures.

Many integral-engine compressors operate with an articulated connecting rod. For this type of engine-driven compressor, two power pistons share a crank throw with the compressor. The hinge pins that attach the power piston connecting rods to the crank are offset, causing the piston locations for each cylinder to be out of phase with each other. This causes top dead center to occur at different crank angles, alters the geometric compression ratio, and also changes the port timings for each cylinder.

In this study, the equations of motion for the pistons of the four possible compressor/piston configurations of a Cooper-Bessemer GMW are developed. With the piston profiles, the intake and exhaust port timings were determined and compared to those of a slider-crank mechanism. The piston profile was then inputted into GT-POWER, an engine modeling software developed by Gamma Technologies, in order to obtain an accurate simulation match to the experimental in-cylinder pressure data collected from a Cooper-Bessemer GMWH-10C.

Assuming the piston motion of an engine with an articulated connecting rod is similar to a slider-crank mechanism can create a difference in port timings. The hinge pin offset creates asymmetrical motion about 180°aTDC, causing the port timings to also be asymmetrical about this location. The largest differences are shown in the intake port opening of about 10° and a difference in exhaust port opening of about 7° when comparing the motion of the correct configuration to the motion of a slider-crank mechanism.

It is shown that properly calculating the piston motion profiles according to the crank articulation and engine geometry provides a good method of simulating in-cylinder pressure data during the compression stroke.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME

Figures

Tables

Interactive Graphics

Video

Country-Specific Mortality and Growth Failure in Infancy and Yound Children and Association With Material Stature

Use interactive graphics and maps to view and sort country-specific infant and early dhildhood mortality and growth failure data and their association with maternal

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In