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Dissimilar Metal Welds: Impact of the Residual Stresses on the Risk of Failure

[+] Author Affiliations
A. Blouin, S. Chapuliot, S. Marie

AREVA NP, Paris La Défense, France

Paper No. PVP2016-63050, pp. V003T03A011; 9 pages
doi:10.1115/PVP2016-63050
From:
  • ASME 2016 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference
  • Volume 3: Design and Analysis
  • Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, July 17–21, 2016
  • Conference Sponsors: Pressure Vessels and Piping Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-5039-8
  • Copyright © 2016 by ASME

abstract

One important part of the integrity demonstration of large ferritic components is based on the demonstration that they could never undergo brittle fracture. Connections between a ferritic component and an austenitic piping (Dissimilar Metal Weld - DMW) have to respect these rules, in particular the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) created by the welding process and which encounters a brittle-to-ductile transition.

Within that frame, the case considered in this article is a Ni base alloy narrow gap weld joint between a ferritic pipe (A533 steel) and an austenitic pipe (316L stainless steel). The aim of the present study is to show that in the same loading conditions, the weld joint is less sensitive to the brittle fracture than the surrounding ferritic part of the component. That is to say that the demonstration should be focused on the ferritic base metal which is the weakest material. In addition, residual stresses are also considered and their impact on the fracture resistance is evaluated.

The bases of this study rely on a stress-based criterion developed by Chapuliot et al, using a threshold stress (σth) below which the cleavage cannot occur. This threshold stress can be used to define the brittle crack occurrence probability, which means it is possible to determine the highest loading conditions without any brittle fracture risk.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME

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