Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology FREE

[+] Author Affiliations
Gary W. Hunter, Liang-Yu Chen, Philip G. Neudeck, Dak Knight

NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH

C. C. Liu, Q. H. Wu, H. J. Zhou

Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

Paper No. 97-GT-494, pp. V004T15A038; 7 pages
  • ASME 1997 International Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Congress and Exhibition
  • Volume 4: Manufacturing Materials and Metallurgy; Ceramics; Structures and Dynamics; Controls, Diagnostics and Instrumentation; Education; IGTI Scholar Award
  • Orlando, Florida, USA, June 2–5, 1997
  • Conference Sponsors: International Gas Turbine Institute
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-7871-2
  • Copyright © 1997 by ASME


The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology. 2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabricarion technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

Copyright © 1997 by ASME
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