0

Full Content is available to subscribers

Subscribe/Learn More  >

Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment for Coal-Fired Power Industry

[+] Author Affiliations
Behrang Pakzadeh, Jay Renew

Southern Research Institute, Cartersville, GA

Jay Wos

Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL

Paper No. POWER2014-32278, pp. V002T10A010; 6 pages
doi:10.1115/POWER2014-32278
From:
  • ASME 2014 Power Conference
  • Volume 2: Simple and Combined Cycles; Advanced Energy Systems and Renewables (Wind, Solar and Geothermal); Energy Water Nexus; Thermal Hydraulics and CFD; Nuclear Plant Design, Licensing and Construction; Performance Testing and Performance Test Codes; Student Paper Competition
  • Baltimore, Maryland, USA, July 28–31, 2014
  • Conference Sponsors: Power Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-4609-4
  • Copyright © 2014 by ASME

abstract

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)’s announcement that it will revise the effluent limitation guidelines for steam electric power generating units could affect not only how power plants use water, but also how they discharge it. The revised guidelines may lower discharge limits for various contaminants in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater including mercury, selenium, arsenic, and nitrate/nitrite. Although the specific details of the guidelines are unknown at present, the power industry is evaluating various technologies that may address the new effluent limitation guidelines and promote water conservation. Moreover, the power industry is looking for avenues to increase water usage efficiency, reuse and recycle throughout its plant processes. Final rule approval is expected by the middle of 2014 and new regulations are expected to be implemented between 2017 and 2022 through 5-year NPDES permit cycles. discharge limits for various contaminants including arsenic, mercury, selenium, and nitrate/nitrite [1]. These pollutant limits may be below the levels achievable today with conventional treatment [2].

A growing interest exists in zero liquid discharge (ZLD) facilities and processes in power plant operations. Potentially stringent discharge limits along with water conservation and reuse efforts are two of the major drivers to achieve ZLD. Potential pollutant levels are so low that ZLD may be the best option, if not an outright requirement [1].

Thermal ZLD systems have been the subject of increased interest and discussion lately. They employ evaporating processes such as ponds, evaporators and crystallizers, or spray dryers to produce a reusable water stream and a solid residue (i.e. waste). Evaporators and crystallizers have been employed in the power industry for a number of years. However, typical A growing interest exists in zero liquid discharge (ZLD) facilities and processes in power plant operations. Potentially stringent discharge limits along with water conservation and reuse efforts are two of the major drivers to achieve ZLD. Potential pollutant levels are so low that ZLD may be the best option, if not an outright requirement. A key disadvantage of thermal ZLD is its high capital cost. One way to reduce this cost is to pre-treat the liquid stream using innovative membrane technologies and reverse osmosis (RO).

Copyright © 2014 by ASME

Figures

Tables

Interactive Graphics

Video

Country-Specific Mortality and Growth Failure in Infancy and Yound Children and Association With Material Stature

Use interactive graphics and maps to view and sort country-specific infant and early dhildhood mortality and growth failure data and their association with maternal

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In