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Measurements of Stretch Statistics at Flame Leading Points for High Hydrogen Content Fuels

[+] Author Affiliations
Andrew Marshall, Julia Lundrigan, Jerry Seitzman, Tim Lieuwen

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

Prabhakar Venkateswaran

Iowa State University, Ames, IA

Paper No. GT2014-26420, pp. V04BT04A032; 13 pages
doi:10.1115/GT2014-26420
From:
  • ASME Turbo Expo 2014: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition
  • Volume 4B: Combustion, Fuels and Emissions
  • Düsseldorf, Germany, June 16–20, 2014
  • Conference Sponsors: International Gas Turbine Institute
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-4569-1
  • Copyright © 2014 by ASME

abstract

Fuel composition has a strong influence on the turbulent flame speed, even at very high turbulence intensities. An important implication of this result is that the turbulent flame speed cannot be extrapolated from one fuel to the next using only the laminar flame speed and turbulence intensity as scaling variables. This paper presents curvature and tangential strain rate statistics of premixed turbulent flames for high hydrogen content fuels. Global (unconditioned) stretch statistics are presented as well as measurements conditioned on the leading points of the flame front. These measurements are motivated by previous experimental and theoretical work that suggests the turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at these points. The data were acquired with high speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a low swirl burner (LSB). We attained measurements for several H2:CO mixtures over a range of mean flow velocities and turbulence intensities. The results show that fuel composition has a systematic, yet weak effect on curvatures and tangential strain rates at the leading points. Instead, stretch statistics at the leading points are more strongly influenced by mean flow velocity and turbulence level. It has been argued that the increased turbulent flame speeds seen with increasing hydrogen content are the result of increasing flame stretch rates, and therefore SL,max values, at the flame leading points. However, the differences observed with changing fuel compositions are not significant enough to support this hypothesis. Additional analysis is needed to understand the physical mechanisms through which the turbulent flame speed is altered by fuel composition effects.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Topics: Fuels , Flames , Hydrogen

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