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Contralateral Boundary Conditions Affect the Biomechanical Response of the Pubic Symphysis During Pelvic Side Impacts

[+] Author Affiliations
Zuoping Li, Jong-Eun Kim, Jorge E. Alonso, James S. Davidson, Alan W. Eberhardt

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL

Paper No. SBC2007-175540, pp. 319-320; 2 pages
doi:10.1115/SBC2007-175540
From:
  • ASME 2007 Summer Bioengineering Conference
  • ASME 2007 Summer Bioengineering Conference
  • Keystone, Colorado, USA, June 20–24, 2007
  • Conference Sponsors: Bioengineering Division
  • ISBN: 0-7918-4798-5

abstract

Clearer understanding of the biomechanics of the pubic symphysis in lateral pelvic impact tests may serve to elucidate the mechanisms of injury in automotive side impacts. While numerous experimental and computational studies have been conducted on the human pelvis, stresses and deformations of the symphysis were never measured, and the role of the boundary conditions supporting the pelvis was not emphasized. The objective of the present study was to develop a biofidelic FE model to investigate the deformations and stresses experienced by the pubic ligaments and interpubic disc under side impact conditions simulating both drop tower experiments and automotive side impacts.

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