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A Validated System-Level Thermodynamic Model of a Reciprocating Compressor With Application to Valve Condition Monitoring

[+] Author Affiliations
Jason R. Kolodziej

Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY

Christopher J. Guerra

Dresser-Rand, Olean, NY

Paper No. DSCC2013-3817, pp. V001T14A003; 10 pages
doi:10.1115/DSCC2013-3817
From:
  • ASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference
  • Volume 1: Aerial Vehicles; Aerospace Control; Alternative Energy; Automotive Control Systems; Battery Systems; Beams and Flexible Structures; Biologically-Inspired Control and its Applications; Bio-Medical and Bio-Mechanical Systems; Biomedical Robots and Rehab; Bipeds and Locomotion; Control Design Methods for Adv. Powertrain Systems and Components; Control of Adv. Combustion Engines, Building Energy Systems, Mechanical Systems; Control, Monitoring, and Energy Harvesting of Vibratory Systems
  • Palo Alto, California, USA, October 21–23, 2013
  • Conference Sponsors: Dynamic Systems and Control Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-5612-3
  • Copyright © 2013 by ASME

abstract

Condition-based health monitoring systems are a very important addition to machinery to monitor the system and assure it is running at the peak efficiency, to schedule maintenance, and prevent catastrophic failure. Recently, these systems have become more common on industrial compression technology. Reciprocating compressor health monitoring systems typically use only indirect measurements, P-V diagrams, to monitor the system’s health.

Specifically, this research focuses on three different valve failure modes that are common in reciprocating compressors: liquid slugging; valve spring fatigue; and valve seat wear. First, a system-level model of a Dresser-Rand industrial reciprocating compressor is derived and validated, experimentally, to better understand how different subsystem dynamics are related through the compressor. Also, a preliminary instrument investigation is conducted to determine what sensor types are the most effective at detecting these faults.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME

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