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Design of a Biologically-Inspired Chemical Sensor

[+] Author Affiliations
Jacquelyn K. S. Nagel

James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA

Paper No. DETC2013-12378, pp. V004T08A049; 10 pages
doi:10.1115/DETC2013-12378
From:
  • ASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference
  • Volume 4: 18th Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference; 2013 ASME/IEEE International Conference on Mechatronic and Embedded Systems and Applications
  • Portland, Oregon, USA, August 4–7, 2013
  • Conference Sponsors: Design Engineering Division, Computers and Information in Engineering Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-5591-1
  • Copyright © 2013 by ASME

abstract

Sensors are an integral part of many engineered products and systems. Biological inspiration has the potential to improve current sensor designs as well as inspire innovative ones. Mimicking nature offers more than just the observable aspects that conjure up engineering solutions performing similar functions, but also less obvious strategic and sustainable aspects. This paper presents the design of an innovative, biologically-inspired chemical sensor that performs “up-front” processing through mechanical filtering. Functional representation and abstraction were used to place the biological system information in an engineering context, and facilitate the bioinspired design process. Inspiration from the physiology (function) of the guard cell coupled with the morphology (form) and physiology of tropomyosin resulted in multiple concept variants for the chemical sensor. The chemical sensor conceptual designs are provided along with detailed descriptions. Applications of the sensor design include environmental monitoring of harmful gases, and a non-invasive approach to detect illnesses including diabetes, liver disease, and cancer on the breath.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Topics: Sensors , Design

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