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A Model of the Canine Stifle Joint With Representation of Medial Meniscus During Squat Motion

[+] Author Affiliations
Antonis Stylianou, Trent Guess, Leo Olcott, Gavin Paiva, Mohammad Kia

University of Missouri - Kansas City, Kansas City, MO

James Cook

University of Missouri, Columbia, MO

Paper No. SBC2011-53715, pp. 857-858; 2 pages
doi:10.1115/SBC2011-53715
From:
  • ASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference
  • ASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference, Parts A and B
  • Farmington, Pennsylvania, USA, June 22–25, 2011
  • Conference Sponsors: Bioengineering Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-5458-7
  • Copyright © 2011 by ASME

abstract

Subject specific anatomical models of the canine stifle can be extremely valuable in understanding the biomechanical risks and causes associated with cranial cruciate ligament and meniscal injuries. Such models would also be powerful in improving preventative and therapeutic strategies for canines [1]. The menisci play an important role in joint function by transmitting tibio-femoral loads and by reducing the pressure on the articular cartilage. Multibody modeling methods often ignore the menisci in order to simplify the representation of the joint structures.

Copyright © 2011 by ASME

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