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An Experimental Investigation of the Quasi-Steady Assumption in Speech

[+] Author Affiliations
Byron D. Erath

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Michael W. Plesniak

George Washington University, Washington, DC

Paper No. SBC2009-206888, pp. 475-476; 2 pages
doi:10.1115/SBC2009-206888
From:
  • ASME 2009 Summer Bioengineering Conference
  • ASME 2009 Summer Bioengineering Conference, Parts A and B
  • Lake Tahoe, California, USA, June 17–21, 2009
  • Conference Sponsors: Bioengineering Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-4891-3
  • Copyright © 2009 by ASME

abstract

Human speech is initiated when the lungs achieve a critical pressure forcing the vocal folds apart, expelling air through the glottis, and beginning self-sustained oscillations. The oscillations arise due to coupling between the aerodynamic forces and the structural properties of the vocal folds. During each phonation cycle the glottis transitions from a convergent channel upon opening, to a uniform, and finally a divergent channel before closing and repeating the cycle. The resulting pulsatile flow field which emanates from the vocal folds forms the raw component of speech.

Copyright © 2009 by ASME

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