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Mitigation of the Large-Scale Oscillation Self-Sustained by Shallow Cavities With a Perforated Lid

[+] Author Affiliations
Stephen A. Jordan

Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Newport, RI

Paper No. HT-FED2004-56508, pp. 999-1009; 11 pages
doi:10.1115/HT-FED2004-56508
From:
  • ASME 2004 Heat Transfer/Fluids Engineering Summer Conference
  • Volume 2, Parts A and B
  • Charlotte, North Carolina, USA, July 11–15, 2004
  • Conference Sponsors: Heat Transfer Division and Fluids Engineering Division
  • ISBN: 0-7918-4691-1 | eISBN: 0-7918-3740-8
  • Copyright © 2004 by ASME

abstract

Flow past cavities covered by perforated lids pose a challenging problem for design engineers. Kelvin-Helmholtz waves appear early in the separated shear layers above the perforations that quickly mature into large-scale coherent structures far downstream. This evolution is sustained by a hydrodynamic feedback mechanism within the cavity even when its aft wall is far removed from the lid. Herein, the results from large-eddy simulations show analogous fundamental characteristics between open and perforated-cover cavities. Both adequately scale the fundamental frequency of the large-scale disturbance using the freestream velocity and the cavity width (or lid length). Moreover, the dimensionless frequencies jump to higher modes at equivalent length scales. Unlike the open cavity, one can invoke certain conditions that instigate the instability above the perforations but not a simultaneous long-term feedback mechanism necessary to fully sustain the periodic oscillation. The lid itself offers options for mitigating (or even eliminating) the instability. Results (for laminar separation) show the perforation spacing as the key factor. While maintaining the same fundamental frequency, one can easily dampen its spectral peak to complete disappearance by extending the perforation spacing.

Copyright © 2004 by ASME

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