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Influence of Turbocharger Imbalance on Subsynchronous Vibration Amplitude

[+] Author Affiliations
R. Gordon Kirk, John Sterling, William Sawyers, Mitchell Saville, T. Bradley McNiff, Lauren Wilvert

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

Paper No. IJTC2009-15027, pp. 213-215; 3 pages
doi:10.1115/IJTC2009-15027
From:
  • ASME/STLE 2009 International Joint Tribology Conference
  • ASME/STLE 2009 International Joint Tribology Conference
  • Memphis, Tennessee, USA, October 19–21, 2009
  • Conference Sponsors: Tribology Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-4895-1 | eISBN: 978-0-7918-3862-4
  • Copyright © 2009 by ASME

abstract

The elimination of sub-synchronous vibration is a major task of rotating machinery engineers. The industry has used applied imbalance to improve stability of vertical pumps which would otherwise be totally unstable. The current interest is for the application of a small imbalance to determine the influence on the level of instability frequency components for a small high speed turbocharger rotor. The initial experimental results for the application of a known imbalance on the compressor end of a high speed turbocharger, indicates a reduced level for the lower instability mode.

Copyright © 2009 by ASME
Topics: Vibration

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