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Effects of Vortices on Sound Propagation

[+] Author Affiliations
R. Michael Jones, Alfred J. Bedard, Jr.

University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

Paper No. IMECE2009-10483, pp. 267-270; 4 pages
doi:10.1115/IMECE2009-10483
From:
  • ASME 2009 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition
  • Volume 15: Sound, Vibration and Design
  • Lake Buena Vista, Florida, USA, November 13–19, 2009
  • Conference Sponsors: ASME
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-4388-8 | eISBN: 978-0-7918-3863-1
  • Copyright © 2009 by ASME

abstract

Our simulations indicate that the presence of a vortex in or near acoustic propagation paths can have profound effects on the distributions of sound energy and cause sound waves to originate from virtual source positions. For example, recent studies have shown that infrasonic energy arrives from the regions of hurricanes. The azimuths measured for a limited number of cases published to date do not seem to originate from the vortex cores; but rather from the periphery of the system. This raises the questions: Is the sound being affected by strong wind and temperature gradients with the measured azimuths indicating virtual source positions? -or- Is the sound generation mechanism located outside of the vortex core?

Copyright © 2009 by ASME
Topics: Sound , Vortices

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