0

Full Content is available to subscribers

Subscribe/Learn More  >

How Dynamic is Dynamic Walking? Human vs. Robotic Gait

[+] Author Affiliations
Carlotta Mummolo, Joo H. Kim

Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, NY

Paper No. DETC2011-47897, pp. 1159-1165; 7 pages
doi:10.1115/DETC2011-47897
From:
  • ASME 2011 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference
  • Volume 6: 35th Mechanisms and Robotics Conference, Parts A and B
  • Washington, DC, USA, August 28–31, 2011
  • Conference Sponsors: Design Engineering Division and Computers and Information in Engineering Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-5483-9
  • Copyright © 2011 by ASME

abstract

For design and control of biped walking robots, it is important to quantify the different level of dynamicity. We propose the Dynamic Gait Measure (DGM) that quantifies the dynamicity of a given biped walking motion. The DGM is associated with the gait stability, and quantifies the effects of inertia in terms of the Zero-Moment Point (ZMP) and the ground projection of center of mass (GCOM). Also, DGM takes into account the stance foot dimension and the relative threshold between static and dynamic walking. Human-like and robotic walking motions are generated for a planar biped system from an optimization problem. The resulting DGMs demonstrate their dependence on the stance foot dimension as well as the walking motion. The DGM results verify the dynamic nature of normal human walking. For a given gait motion, smaller foot dimension results in increased dynamicity. Moreover, the DGMs for normal human walking are greater than those for robotic walking. The proposed results will benefit the development of walking robots.

Copyright © 2011 by ASME
Topics: Robotics

Figures

Tables

Interactive Graphics

Video

Country-Specific Mortality and Growth Failure in Infancy and Yound Children and Association With Material Stature

Use interactive graphics and maps to view and sort country-specific infant and early dhildhood mortality and growth failure data and their association with maternal

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In