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A Basic Correction to the Orthogonal Metal Cutting Models

[+] Author Affiliations
Lewis N. Payton

Auburn University, Auburn, AL

Paper No. MSEC2009-84324, pp. 455-465; 11 pages
doi:10.1115/MSEC2009-84324
From:
  • ASME 2009 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference
  • ASME 2009 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, Volume 1
  • West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, October 4–7, 2009
  • Conference Sponsors: Manufacturing Engineering Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-4361-1 | eISBN: 978-0-7918-3859-4
  • Copyright © 2009 by ASME

abstract

Metal cutting as a science remains more art than science. A truly predictive model for use in quantitative modeling has eluded researchers to date, leading the noted mathematician, R. Hill [1] to observe that “it is notorious that the extant theories of the mechanics of machining do not agree well with experiment”. Extensive experiments with a videographic quick stop device (VQSD) by the author indicate an extremely simple reason for these disagreements. A simple correction that is applicable to all of the classic orthogonal models of metal cutting is presented. A detailed application to the classic Merchant Force Diagram is then developed.

Copyright © 2009 by ASME
Topics: Metal cutting

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