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Crack Initiation in Railway Wheels Resulting From Rolling Contacts

[+] Author Affiliations
Steven L. Dedmon

Standard Steel, LLC, Burnham, PA

Huseyin Guzel

BNSF Railway Company, Topeka, KS

Paper No. JRC2011-56119, pp. 345-354; 10 pages
doi:10.1115/JRC2011-56119
From:
  • 2011 Joint Rail Conference
  • 2011 Joint Rail Conference
  • Pueblo, Colorado, USA, March 16–18, 2011
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-5459-4 | eISBN: 978-0-7918-3893-8
  • Copyright © 2011 by ASME

abstract

Classic shelling of a railway wheel begins with crack initiation resulting from wheel rail interactions. This investigation shows the complex relationships that occur between contact stress, cold work, residual stresses, and temperatures from brake heating and non-metallic inclusion types which can lead to the formation of shelling cracks. Our investigation also includes an explanation of how these interactions affect mechanical properties such as yield strength, elastic modulus, and ductility. In turn, mechanical property changes also affect how cold work and its associated residual stresses develop under cyclic loading. Destructive testing and Finite Element Analyses were used in support of this work.

Copyright © 2011 by ASME

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