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Investigation on Creep-Rupture Failure Time of HDPE Pipe Under Hydrostatic Pressure

[+] Author Affiliations
Cheng Xu, Ping Xu, Jianfeng Shi

Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Paper No. PVP2011-57840, pp. 913-918; 6 pages
doi:10.1115/PVP2011-57840
From:
  • ASME 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference
  • Volume 6: Materials and Fabrication, Parts A and B
  • Baltimore, Maryland, USA, July 17–21, 2011
  • Conference Sponsors: Pressure Vessels and Piping Division
  • ISBN: 978-0-7918-4456-4
  • Copyright © 2011 by ASME

abstract

There are three typical failure modes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe under hydrostatic pressure, which are relatively caused by creep, slow crack growth, and degradation. The duration time of HDPE pipe under hydrostatic pressure before creep-rupture failure is predicted based on a viscoelastic constitutive model. It is found that, hoop stress increases due to reduction in wall thickness of HDPE pipe because of creep, while yielding stress decreases owing to the decrease in creep rate. When the hoop stress approaches the yielding stress, the pipe will quickly deform and then structural failure will follow.

Copyright © 2011 by ASME

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