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Impact Properties of Syntactic Foams and Effect of Microballoon Wall Thickness

[+] Author Affiliations
Tien-Chih Lin, Nikhil Gupta

Polytechnic University

Paper No. IMECE2006-13616, pp. 77-82; 6 pages
doi:10.1115/IMECE2006-13616
From:
  • ASME 2006 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition
  • Applied Mechanics
  • Chicago, Illinois, USA, November 5 – 10, 2006
  • Conference Sponsors: Applied Mechanics Division
  • ISBN: 0-7918-4766-7 | eISBN: 0-7918-3790-4
  • Copyright © 2006 by ASME

abstract

Hollow particle (microballoon) filled polymeric composites, called syntactic foams, are tested for impact properties in the present work. Izod type pendulum impact testing is carried out on eight types of foams, which are made of four types of microballoons used in volume fractions of 0.5 and 0.6. Variation in the volume fraction of microballoons leads to a difference in the total energy absorbed during fracture of different types of foams. Results show that syntactic foams containing microballoons of lower density show lower impact strength because of the lower strength of these microballoons. An increase in microballoon volume fraction leads to decreased energy absorption and strength.

Copyright © 2006 by ASME

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